Thank God It's Friday or Good Friday?

I’m off this weekend so that statement makes this even more meaningful.

Take A Walk with Me Around Blogland or Links of Interest

Maili aka Jaili is doing film reviews at Dear Author on Fridays. She’s not done one of my favorites yet. What is that you ask? Well, Bridget Jones Diary (hint, hint) but then the review she did today is a favorite film of mine, too, Ladyhawke. I remember it well. Good movie.

Bloggers MIA or Where Are They Now?

blogging-bullhornBloggers missing in action. You know, it is rather difficult to come up with new topics everyday. I really feel bad for picking on these guys (no I don’t) but would it hurt to do a quick post to say: I am still alive or something? Hope you all are doing OK and that your muse is just on strike. Now that I think about it, some of these peeps might not be online anymore? Or gasp! Have a social life.

Academic Assertions on Popular Fiction or The Analyzing of Popular Fiction

Jessica over at Racy Romance Reviews is in NOLA for the “Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Annual Meeting (for posterity: April 2009).” I am really enjoying reading her commentary over there but anyway, she’s been posting about the academic take on some of the popular novels today. Most notably, Twilight and Sookie Stackhouse series. Took note of this post on “Academics Take a Bite out of Sookie Stackhouse” where Jessica gives readers the important points of the papers presented at the conference. I took note of this statement on the Sookie series:

The TV series is an improvement on the novels because (a) the tone switches in the novels from humor to horror and this is better achieved with visual media, and (b) because the novels portray a white de-racialized, de-ethnicized rural South, which the show features complex African American characters

I’ve not watched the entire series to agree or disagree with that assertion. Interesting point though because there are more African Americans on the TV series versus the books (or what I’ve read thus far). I’ve asked on Twitter if the HBO show was a success or a failure? Most of my respondents had never read the books and enjoyed the show. I’m a reader who read the books (or most of them) and found the HBO series lacking. I’ve watched all of one episode and just don’t get it. Anyway, check out her website. There’s a lot over there to sift through and ponder over (Twilight anyone?)

That’s it for today’s blog hopping. Yeah. It was short and sweet. I have a book I’m trying to finish and another one I need to start. So, I hope you all have a good weekend. The forecasts promises rain. Good. Nothing better to set the mood right while reading a really good book (and I’m reading one).

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About Keishon

Voracious reader of just about everything.
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3 Responses to Thank God It's Friday or Good Friday?

  1. I think the show is far superior to the books, and I definitely expected the opposite to be the case. But then, I read the books and didn’t understand what all the uproar was about. (I’ve been told that were I from the South, I would have liked them more. Meh.)

    Then I saw the show.

    The characters in the show are so much more. They’re filled out real people, not just sketches that only matter when they can be used as plot devices. And my favorite characters from the show are barely mentioned in the books. Sad.

    I did only read the first three books, so if it gets better after that, I wouldn’t know.

  2. Jessica says:

    Thanks for the linkage!

    I can answer one question: the HBO show True Blood started out very small in terms of ratings but built each week, so much that it is now considered a big success.

    I haven;t watched it (no HBO) but plan to rent the DVD when it comes out in May of the First Season.

    One of the things the show did was make Sookie’s best friend, Tara, black, and give her a bigger story line. So that’s one example to defend the quotation above.

    Although I think Harris is dealing with race all the time, in a metaphrical way by writing about weres and vamps etc., it is undeniable that there is no major character who is black. For a series of novels set in rural Louisiana, this seems odd.

  3. Avid Reader says:

    Hi Heather, you said:

    Heather Petty: I think the show is far supe­rior to the books, and I def­i­nitely expected the oppo­site to be the case. But then, I read the books and didn’t under­stand what all the uproar was about. (I’ve been told that were I from the South, I would have liked them more. Meh.)

    I was at first put off by Sookie’s voice until I got used to it. If it wasn’t for this reading challenge that I’m doing, I wouldn’t have picked up these books otherwise. I’ve only read the first three books as well.

    Hi Jessica, you said:

    One of the things the show did was make Sookie’s best friend, Tara, black, and give her a bigger story line. So that’s one exam­ple to defend the quo­ta­tion above.

    Although I think Harris is deal­ing with race all the time, in a metaphri­cal way by writ­ing about weres and vamps etc., it is unde­ni­able that there is no major char­ac­ter who is black. For a series of novels set in rural Louisiana, this seems odd.

    Odd indeed. I’m glad Alan Ball has given this show much more substance with a more diverse cast. Tara – had a itty bitty role in the books and I think it’s Lafayette? The gay black cook at Merlott’s? was the only black person in the book. Will he show up next season? If so, then Allan Ball is not following the books anymore and if from what I’ve seen here and there, he went backwards plotwise with the series compared to the order of events from the books.

    Plan to read the academic take on Twilight. It’s amazing how much that book has been picked apart.

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